The AB and ZZZZZs of Sleep for Athletes: Get Your Rest Before Taking Your Baseline Test!

by Sherray Holland, PA-C
HeadFirst Concussion Care Provider

It is recommended to get a good night’s sleep on a regular basis, but how much is considered a “good” amount? How long do you sleep?  I am mainly asking high school and college athletes here. And I know sometimes it is easier said than done when you factor in homework, sports, other extracurricular activities….maybe even a job!

Picture this: You are eager to start your season.  Then your coach or athletic trainer tells you to take a baseline test. You may have heard about it from other students or not at all. Most schools and many organizations, including HeadFirst Concussion Care, are using the ImPACT® baseline test to measure the way an athlete’s brain functions, including cognitive thinking, memory and reaction time. The computerized test takes about 25 minutes to complete (as cited in Lovell, 2010) and is intended to give your coach, trainer, and provider a baseline measure of your normal brain function. In the unfortunate event of a concussion, you will take the ImPACT test over time (usually every office visit) to help your healthcare provider, coach, athletic trainer, and teachers make proper decisions for school and returning to play as you recover.

Getty Images

Getty Images

Okay, back to the subject at hand. Now it is the night before the baseline test. How long should you sleep? A recent study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine reported that athletes who slept fewer than seven hours before the baseline performed worse on three of four ImPACT scores and reported more symptoms related to their brain injury (as cited in McClure, et al., 2014).

Here’s the bottom line: it is important to get enough sleep on a regular basis, aiming for more than seven hours. If you do not get enough sleep before your ImPACT test, it may not represent your academic ability at its best, especially if you have to go through the entire day and take it after school. Many times in the HeadFirst clinic, I have seen the results of a patient’s test after a suspected concussion better than his or her baseline!  Remember, this is a serious matter so make sure to put your best effort forward. I hope you found this helpful and would like to hear your thoughts.

Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

Having trouble falling or staying asleep? Here are some helpful advice for healthy sleep habits:

  • Keep a regular bedtime routine every night
  • Do not exercise or eat a heavy meal three hours prior to going to bed
  • Do not drink or eat foods with caffeine three hours prior to going to bed
  • Avoid naps. If you are tired and must take a nap, make sure it is a short nap and not close to your bedtime.
  • Rest and unwind before heading to bed. Avoid stimulating television shows or video games.
  • Make sure your room is quiet, comfortable, and without bright lights.
  • If you do not go to sleep after 30 minutes,  try reading , listening to music, or other quiet activities to encourage relaxation.

Ms. Holland typically works at HeadFirst Waugh Chapel clinic. She received her Bachelor of Science in Physician Assistant Studies/Certificate in Primary Care at Howard University. Ms. Holland is a Board-certified Physician Assistant and is a member of the American Academy of Physician Assistants and an American Academy of Physician Assistants Veteran’s Caucus Member.

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