Concussion Concerns Raised Again in the World Cup Finals

by Tony Doran, Psy.D.
HeadFirst Concussion Care Program Director

Germany may have won the 2014 World Cup, but their team wasn’t immune to head injury. In Sunday’s final game when Germany won against Argentina, German midfielder Christoph Kramer was hit hard in the face with a shoulder charge and knocked right off his feet. He was slow to get up and clearly disoriented but continued playing for another 14 minutes before slumping and needing help off the field. Even then, Kramer had difficulty maintaining his balance and appeared dazed despite attempting to shrug off the injury.

World-Cup-204-Kramer-Concussion

Hassan Ammar/AP Photo

For the International level and professional level, games committee members will need to change the rule to allow an immediate substitution for a suspected concussion that doesn’t count against a team’s three-substitute rule for the entire game. Coaches and doctors can then immediately recommend subs to relieve the injured players.

For college, high school, club and recreational athletes playing soccer, the hits and concussions seen over the course of the World Cup have been good learning lessons about concussions. For coaches, the World Cup injuries are clear examples of when a child needs to be removed from a game and be evaluated and cleared by a medical professional prior to returning to practice or games.

With the action of the World Cup being, quite literally, on the world’s stage, we hope concussions finally get the attention they deserve.

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