How Well Do Football Helmets Protect Players from Concussions?

by Tony Doran, Psy.D.
HeadFirst Concussion Care Program Director

One of the most common questions that I get from parents is “How well will my child’s helmet protect against concussion?”

The elusive answer appears to have been provided at the 2014 American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting. In a study co-authored by Frank Conidi, MD, DO, MS, director of the Florida Center for Headache and Sports Neurology, Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology at Florida State University College of Medicine, the standard drop test was modified to measure linear and rotational responses in crash test dummies to repeated 12 mile-per-hour impacts.

Conidi, who is also the vice chair of the American Academy of Neurology’s Sports Neurology Section, and his colleagues conducted 330 tests to measure how well 10 popular football helmet designs protected against traumatic brain injury, including: Adams a2000, Rawlings Quantum, Riddell 360, Riddell Revolution, Riddell Revolution Speed, Riddell VSR4, Schutt Air Advantage, Schutt DNA Pro+, Xenith X1 and Xenith X2.

They found that helmets do protect the player from massive injuries like skull fractures in the range of 70 to 80 percent but provide little to no protection against concussion in the range of 10 to 15 percent.

Why is that? While the helmet does its job in disbursing the impact of a hard hit across the helmet to greatly reduce the risk of a skull fracture at one specific site, a helmet cannot stop the brain from shaking inside the skull, thus providing little to no protection against a concussion.

In fact, the team of scientists found that football helmets, on average, reduce the risk of traumatic brain injury by only 20 percent compared to not wearing a helmet. Added to these statistics, Conidi says, “Alarmingly, those that offered the least protection are among the most popular on the field.”

One of the best tools we have available is neurocognitive baseline testing. With the beginning of the school year upon us, please remember to get your child baseline tested. Headfirst Concussion Care offers free ImPACT® baseline testing. Please call 1-855-748-4868 (SIT-IT-OUT) or visit us online to arrange your child’s appointment.

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Fall Sports are a Great Time to Learn About Concussion Symptoms

by Tony Doran, Psy.D.
HeadFirst Concussion Care Program Director

Fall sports are right around the corner, which means doctors will see an uptick in the number of traumatic brain injuries.

Here are a few tips for parents to keep their kids safe throughout the season:

#1 – Get educated on concussions and mild traumatic brain injury. Learn what the symptoms are so if your child is experiencing some difficulties, you‘ll be able to identify the problem.  Common symptoms following a concussion are:
•    Physical – headache, dizziness, balance problems, fatigue, light and noise sensitivity
•    Cognitive – problems concentrating or remembering information, feeling foggy, and feeling slowed down
•    Emotional – feeling more irritable or sad, feeling more nervous or feeling more overwhelmed
•    Sleep – feeling drowsy, sleeping to little or too much, and trouble falling asleep

#2 – Talk with your kids about concussions. Let them know about the symptoms and that they should tell their coach and yourself if they aren’t feeling well after a game or practice

#3 – Focus on the goal of why your child is playing sports. Great goals include:
•    the importance of team work
•    discipline (especially if that effort can be translated into the classroom)
•    making friends and getting some exercise.

Keep it in perspective that most of children are not focused on the pros – they’re in sports for the sheer love of playing. If your child is injured, please take a conservative approach and wait until he or she is completely healed (without the above-listed symptoms) before returning to competitive athletic competition.

#4. Familiarize yourself with Maryland law regarding concussion. Every state now has concussion laws regulating traumatic brain injuries in youth sports. These laws generally have three major components: to educate parents, coaches and players about concussions; to remove the athlete from play if he or she is suspected of having a concussion; and to ensure the child is cleared by a medical provider to return to play.

#5. Familiarize yourself with the policies of your child’s school and team. Make sure that your son or daughter gets baseline neuro-cognitive testing in the unfortunate event they do sustain an injury. Doctors can look back and see what your child’s performance was like prior to the sports season.

We have thousands of visits a month to treat head traumas.  I am often asked if sports are worth it. Absolutely! Kids learn leadership, companionship, competition, exercise, emotional balance, and many other values and benefits of sports. The primary danger with a head injury is returning too soon before the injury has had a chance to heal itself. Play it safe. And remember, when in doubt sit it out.

HeadFirst Concussion Care - Fall Sports - Concussions