Be Cautious of New Products or Research That Promise to Prevent or Heal Concussions

by Tony Doran, Psy.D.
HeadFirst Concussion Care Program Director

Periodically when I’m seeing patients in our HeadFirst concussion clinics, parents will ask me about a different brain trauma-related studies that they’ve heard about. These questions range from studies about concussion-healing chocolate milk to eye tracking devices to the effectiveness of helmets and different sports bands preventing head injuries. Presently, NO concussion treatments have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Likewise, the FDA has yet to approve of any devices that prevent concussions in the first place. No helmets, no mouth guards, no sports band or other piece of technology in any way shape or form has been demonstrated to completely prevent concussions.

I typically advise parents to be extremely cautious with new research or technology, or with the promises of concussion treatment. Instead, parents should seek out a concussion specialist who has years of experience treating these injuries and utilizes multiple methods in their assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning.

Refreshing Delicious Chocolate Milk

Can chocolate milk heal concussions? Don’t count on it.

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The Connection Between Concussions and Suicide

by Tony Doran, Psy.D.
HeadFirst Concussion Care Program Director

The topic of mild traumatic brain injury and/or concussion has been in the news for several years. The release of a major motion picture, a concussion sustained by a professional sports star, or the passage of a law tends to rekindle interest in the topic. Recently, another issue was linked to concussion — the concern of suicide. But, I am optimistic. Why? By nature, I’m an optimist, but I’m also hopeful that parents, community leaders and politicians will pay attention to the epidemic of suicide in our country.

When I worked in the U.S. Navy, one of my careers was serving as their Suicide Prevention Program Coordinator. Every death by suicide crossed my desk. The number of Marines and Sailors who attempted and completed suicide staggered me.

In our country, the number of people — servicemembers or civilian — who die by suicide is almost too much to comprehend. Compared to 16,000 homicides each year in the U.S., the number of suicides is nearly double that at almost 32,000 a year, most due to untreated depression of some form.

Let’s put those numbers in another perspective: In the last decade of our troops fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq, just over 7,000 Americans have made the ultimate sacrifice and almost 50,000 have been wounded. During that same time, more than 300,000 have died by suicide and more than 50,000 have been children between the ages of 14 and 24. The number of suicide attempts is in the millions.

Researchers are also finding out that some of the consequences of concussion are linked to depression and suicide. Untreated brain injuries can lead to devastating consequences.

My optimism lies in the hope that coaches, parents, athletes, and community leaders understand that the physiology of a concussion caused by a blow to the head or body prompts the neurons to function ineffectively due to a disruption of their normal chemical process.

I’m optimistic that these same parents, coaches, athletes, and community leaders will make the connection that the neurological process of a concussion is to depression. That these neurons which govern our emotions and self-esteem for a variety of different reasons — the death of a loved one, loss of a job, bankruptcy, medical conditions — can lead to a disruption of the neurons and cause depression leading to suicide.

I’m optimistic that the people who form every individual’s support system, from parents and teachers to friends and fellow athletes, will ACT if something seems amiss:
A — ask an individual if he or she is thinking about suicide
C — let him or her know you care about them
T — get the individual to treatment with someone who specializes in suicide evaluations: a counselor, pastor or chaplain, family doctor or pediatrician, psychologist, or psychiatrist or local emergency room

Concussion-Suicide-Risk-March-2016-900x900I’m optimistic that people will realize that depression can be considered the “common cold” of psychiatric conditions and has a variety of effective treatment options.

I’m optimistic that people will pass on the suicide prevention hotline number and website to those in crisis: 1-800-273-TALK and www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

And finally, I’m optimistic that people will pass this blog and information onto at least FIVE other people and in doing so, might just save a life.

How Much “Strict Brain Rest” is Needed After a Concussion?

by Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D.
Founder & Chief Medical Officer, NeurExpand Brain Center
Guest Contributor

Guidelines by the American Academy of Neurology, American Academy of Pediatrics, and many sport organizations emphasize the importance of brain rest after a mild TBI. Now, a new study published in the January 5 issue of Pediatrics questions the validity of recommending 5 days of strict rest to all children who suffer a concussion.

Authors examined the difference between the outcomes of two groups of children (average age of 13-14 years old) who presented within 24 hours of a head injury to an emergency room. Half were told to rest for as long as needed, usually for 1-2 days, followed by stepwise return to the usual level of activity. The other half was told to rest for 5 days, without engaging in any school or work engagements, followed by stepwise return to activity. Participants had neurocognitive (ImPACT) and balance assessments at baseline and at their follow-up visits at 3 and 10 days. They also kept a diary of their activity level and how they felt.

In both groups, 60% of participants reported resolution of their symptoms. However, half of the “strict rest group” took 3 additional days to reach a full recovery. This strict rest group also tended to have a larger amount of emotional issues, as they were kept away from school and social settings. Children in the strict rest group who had headaches at the onset of their concussion tended to have lingering symptoms for a longer period of time than the control group. The one exception to better outcomes in the control group was for children who had immediate loss of consciousness or amnesia at the time of their injury. These children seemed to benefit from 5 days of strict brain rest.

brain-rest-bench

In general, it appears that not all children who experience a mild TBI should receive a prescription for strict 5-day brain rest. There may be benefits in treating each patient individually, depending on their initial symptoms, level of cognitive function, and severity of concussion. Some may need no rest, some may need 1-2 days of rest, and yet others may need 5 or more days of avoiding demanding brain stimulation.  More studies are needed before the current guidelines can change. The one recommendation that is gaining more support in recent years is to have patients engage in exercise early in their post-concussive period.  Increasing physical activity tends to do wonders for rehabilitation of patients who suffer from a stroke (which is a vascular brain injury) and it may be just as beneficial for kids or adults who have had a traumatic brain injury.

For now, if you have had a brain injury, please be sure to see your doctor or a sports medicine specialist who is familiar with concussion management issues. Your brain is a precious organ and it’s important to work with experts in the field  on controlling your symptoms and finding the best resolution for full recovery. Otherwise you may end up having lingering post-concussive symptoms for months, years, or decades.

SOURCE: Anderson, P. (2015, January 7). Strict Rest After Concussion Offers No Additional Benefit.