Concussion Awareness Spreads with News Headlines

by Tony Doran, Psy.D.
HeadFirst Concussion Care Program Director

Regardless of age and profession, motor vehicle accidents and falls are the most common ways that people can sustain traumatic brain injuries. Even first responders – police, fire, and ambulance crews – regularly go into harm’s way and risk personal injury that includes concussions, as recently happened when two firefighters in New Jersey slipped while jumping off their fire engine at a house fire.

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Even firefighters and other first responders are vulnerable to concussions (Photo: AP/Wide World)

Although sports like football, soccer, and lacrosse get a majority of the press about head traumas and traumatic brain injuries, most of the traumatic brain injuries that we see in HeadFirst Concussion clinics are due to everyday events such as slips and falls and motor vehicle accidents.

Some doctors tell me that the “concussion craze” is going to burn out soon. However, I think the way concussion specialists and medical providers diagnosis and treat traumatic brain injuries will continue to evolve. Other clinicians believe that education, evaluation and treatment of mTBIs will continue to grow in different directions.

Some considerations for the future may include:
– people who carry weapons, work with hazardous materials, or are employed in high-risk jobs could require baseline neurocognitive testing with their employment physical in the event they suffer a brain injury
– schoolchildren of all ages, including the elementary school level, may receive education, baseline testing, while training may be required for all parents and coaches about traumatic brain injuries (it is presently only required for high school kids)
– employers may insist employees to get baseline neurocognitive testing prior as a condition of employment

What we have found in HeadFirst Concussion clinics is that 60-70% of mTBIs are not sports related and more than 95% of our injured patients have not had baseline neurocognitive testing. While concussions continue to make the news and diagnosis increase as public awareness spreads, we encourage people of all ages to schedule a baseline neurocognitive test.

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March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

by Tony Doran, Psy.D.
HeadFirst Concussion Care Program Director

In the past several years, few medical problems have generated as much public interest as sports-related concussions. Coaches, parents, and players are increasingly aware that a concussion involves an injury to the brain and that an athlete suspected of having a concussion should be removed from play and evaluated by a licensed health care professional. I’d like to share a little bit about myself and how I became interested in the area of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

My name is Dr. Tony Doran. I was a clinical psychologist for the Navy for the past 20 years. The Navy sent me to Harvard Medical School and I specialized in pediatric neuropsychology. Over the course of my career, I have worked in a variety of diverse positions at Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Iwakuni Medical Clinic Japan, and the United States Naval Academy. I have treated kids and adults with everything from adjustment reactions and craniosynostosis to mTBI and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder).

As my time in the military was winding down, I began to explore where my next adventure would take me and I naturally gravitated to conducting evaluations for Special Forces Units throughout the United States. After more than 10 years of war, I have treated and evaluated hundreds of service men and women who were dealing with the wounds of war coping with PTSD and mTBI. As the war was coming to a close, I began to look at what other avenues I could explore. My contracting position of evaluating Special Forces Units involved a lot of travel away from my family, which initially was exciting and interesting, but after 3 years was beginning to wear on myself and my family. So I began to look for a permanent position.

Having been a consultant, I had performed some services for a new company in the area of concussion care called HeadFirst. HeadFirst was evaluating and treating hundreds of kids with mTBI and a substantial percentage of these kids had some special needs – autism, learning disabilities, attention problems or other psychological problem. My experience and training in mTBI and childhood disorders would help me treat and evaluate these children. HeadFirst was looking for someone to evaluate the enormous amount of data they were beginning to collect and also help them branch off and start new research projects. My years of data analysis and research in the Navy would assist me in this area. Several weeks later, I was hired as the Program Director of HeadFirst. I look forward to educating parents, children and coaches in the area about mTBI, treating children and teens with mTBI, and conducting research in the area of mTBI.

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I was at a meeting the other night with several health care providers and asked them to please share a story about what a concussed child or family member had asked them about after brain rest had been explained to them. As we went around the room, kids and family members asked about playing the drums, going snowboarding, playing football with dad in the yard, sleigh riding, mountain climbing, just shooting baskets or just swinging in a batting cage. Answers like theirs beg the question: Are our kids, families, and coaches getting the message about the seriousness of mTBI?

Pardon the Navy analogy, but sometimes big ships take a while to turn. I am encouraged when I hear teens make comments like “Hey, that kid has to stay out of competition for at least 7 to 10 days” after witnessing a concussion and a parent discussing with a child that she might need to permanently switch to a different sport – like track or swimming – after her fourth concussion in soccer. However, when I still get questions like “Can I go ride my go cart?” after explaining brain rest, I am reminded that we, as providers, educators and researchers, have more work to do.

If you are interested in joining the concussion discussion, please visit this blog as we will be having different providers, coaches, parents and recovering patients contribute. Also please see our website for community events.

The Brain Injury Association of Maryland is having their annual conference March 20th-21st – please see their website to find out more and I hope to see you there.